Tags

14 pages tagged with History:

  • ActionAid: the ‘postal parent’ advert by SOFII These two black and white ads look dated now, and the first of these at least seems patronising too. But when these ‘postal parent’ advertisements appeared in the UK in the mid 1970s they were state-of-the art, the epitome of direct response fundraising.
  • ActionAid: the inserts with built-in reply mechanism by SOFII This promotion raised £millions and won almost every direct marketing award going. It also helped propel a new and little known organisation called ActionAid into the list of Britain's top 20 charities. Action Aid created a new format, which was then copied by dozens, perhaps hundreds of other organisations.
  • Amnesty International: the pen pack by SOFII Amnesty needed a powerful and effective means of recruiting new donors to their great cause. This was it. This was, as far as we know, the first ever occasion when a free pen was included in an acquisition mailing, in the UK at least. This mailing was both brilliantly successful and started a trend that led to a flood of imitators.
  • Botton Village ‘Frances’ pack by SOFII Botton Village was a pioneer of relationship fundraising. This is fundraising direct mail as it should be – sincere, engaging, heart-warming and very compelling.
  • Deerfield Academy: the Bruce Barton classic long copy letter from 1925 that pulled a 100 per cent response by Carolina Herrera He sounds like the racy detective hero from a 1930s crime thriller. But Bruce Barton is something else, for sure – a great copywriter and communicator.
  • Dr Barnardo’s Homes: four fundraising greats from the distant past by SOFII
  • Following the fold by Lyndall Stein Lyndall Stein shows that you're never too old to learn some new tricks and passes on some fundraising tips for the young from the old.
  • Harold Sumption: the shy pioneer by Joanna Culling In this addition to SOFII’s Fundraising Legends series, Joanna Culling talks to Ken Burnett, who proudly shares the full text of Harold’s only published material – Yesterday’s trail-blazing and pointers for tomorrow. 
  • The Collection Tin by Sam Butler Different ways to raise money for charities nowadays are seemingly endless. Yet the humble collection tin continues to stand silently by thousands of tills in shops, pubs, or in the hands of generous volunteers. Click here to see a variety of collection boxes from years passed and be astonished at the amazing amount of money raised.
  • The early Christian Church: Paul the apostle motivates his church’s donors – c. 56 AD by SOFII This could be the first ever appeal for regular, committed donors. In the early days of the Christian church the missionary Paul asked his supporters in the city of Corinth to set aside a small portion of their income regularly, to sustain victims of a famine and then later to support good works generally.
  • The father of modern day fundraising: Harold Sumption by SOFII Ken Burnett was just 26 years old when he met Harold Sumption the man who would profoundly influence Ken's understanding of fundraising. In another of our occasional series, 'The most brilliant fundraiser I ever met' we have recollections from Ken, Giles Pegram and Pierre-Bernard Le Bas.
  • The first ever major donor dinner – c. 970 BC by SOFII With a clear target, a list of major prospects, an inspirational lead gift and a fantastic end result, the only thing that's not 'state of the art' about this event is that it happened 3,000 years ago.
  • The Foundling Hospital appeal, 1728-1745 by Tobin Aldrich Another opportunity to be inspired by fundraisers of the past. Raffles, art gallery events and benefit concerts are common ways to raise money today – but when Thomas Coram was fundraising for the Foundling Hospital in Georgian London he employed all these methods. In fact, some might say he invented them…
  • William Quarrier – the most determined fundraiser of all time? by Simon Burne Be inspired by the most determined fundraiser of all time. Using an approach not designed for the faint-hearted, William Quarrier went into a room full of wealthy people and walked out with enough money to fund a village for homeless children in Glasgow. But how did he do it? And what can we learn from this fundraising superstar?