A question of competency

This article relates to the Commission on the Donor Experience project 14: Getting the right people as fundraisers.

Written by
Helena Sharpstone
Added
June 13, 2017

I take my hat off to people who get a buzz from interviewing for staff. I’d rather have root canal work. All those endless questions to people you know aren’t a good fit about five minutes in to the meeting. Pinning your hopes on the best of the bunch only to have them turn you down. Candidates whose CV is a work of fantasy. It’s a minefield. But it has to be done and if done properly it can be satisfying and get you good people.

Interviewing well for fundraisers is like interviewing for any post. It’s all about the questions you ask. If you truly are committed to donor-centred fundraising it needs to feature big in all your selection processes from the job and, in particular, the person specification to the questions you ask at interview.

The best way to find out what you really want to know and get reliable responses is to ask competency-based questions.  These encourage the candidate to demonstrate real experience in areas of the post where you need them to be – well – competent. They can talk about what they have done and the result, not what they might or would do.  Put another way, competency-based questions are more systematic, they target a specific skill or competency. Candidates are asked questions relating to their behaviour in specific circumstances, which they then need to back up with concrete examples. This is an excellent way to probe the true nature of their donor-centred approach.

Try to avoid hypothetical questions, the ‘how would you...?’ types. I would love to think I’d save the drowning dog, run in to the burning building as an act of rescue, stand up for someone being abused on a train – but how do I know until it happens? The only reliable information is what I have done and a competency-based question will find that out. You’re looking out for questions that begin:

  • Tell us about a time when... ?
  • Give an example of something you have done...
  • How did you tackle... ?
  • How have you coped with... ?
  • What has been your approach to... ?
  • Name three things that you have personally implemented...

and so on.

Watch out for answers that may mask real, individual experience.  Warning bells should go off if you hear too much of the word ‘we’. Don’t be afraid to ask What specifically did you contribute to the project?’ Can you tell us more about your personal involvement?What results were down to you? Also watch out for overuse of the same example in their answers, especially if experience is what you want. Some fundraisers are truly experienced, some are just having the same experience over and over again.

So to make the search for fundraisers more palatable and more productive, the competency-questions approach is the way to go. It means you are putting your potential next fundraiser in the best possible place to demonstrate her, or his, donor-centred approach and experience.  

About the author: Helena Sharpstone

Helena Sharpstone

Helena is co-owner of leadership and team development consultancy Sharpstone Skinner. She’s an experienced facilitator, mentor, coach, speaker and writer working with leaders, teams and individuals to improve performance and impact. A licensed practitioner of insights learning and development, Helena’s specialties include leadership coaching, management development, team spring clean, personal effectiveness, presentation skills, and interview techniques.

Recent Articles

How to create a donor journey map

Ally Smith of fundraising technology company Fundraising KIT shows you how to create a donor journey map and shares why they’re important to your fundraising strategy.

Read more

Stop f***ing about with your logo and stick to fundraising instead

Mark Phillips of Bluefrog Fundraising explores the potential negative impacts of a major charity rebrand and explains why good fundraising is where your emphasis should be.

Read more

Cinq choses à savoir sur les crypto-monnaies

Les crypto-monnaies peuvent-elles représenter une nouvelle source de revenus pour les ONG ? Cet article explique leur fonctionnement et comment elles peuvent être bénéfiques pour les organismes de bienfaisance.

Read more

Cresce la paura e si ritorna ai bisogni di base: seconda settimana del monitoraggio circa il sentimento comune sul coronavirus

Ecco un articolo interessante per chi è curioso di comprendere le scelte compiute dai donatori durante la pandemia. Scelte ancora attuali che ci aiutano a capire come l’essenziale sia sempre la scelta prioritaria.

Read more

An important announcement from SOFII

After 15 years of curating great fundraising ideas, inspiration, and resources for fundraisers all over the world, SOFII’s co-founder and trustee Ken Burnett has retired from The SOFII Foundation board. 

Read more